Year 7

In Year 7, students are taught in form groups for the first half-term. At the end of the half-term they will be assessed and put into sets according to ability. There are four higher, four middle and three lower sets. All students begin by studying the same two topics (A and E), and at assessment points all the students will have studied the same topics, but the order of the topics varies from class to class in order to avoid shortages of equipment.

Course Description
The Science course, following the National Curriculum, has been updated this year by science teachers at The Kingsway School.

The Curriculum is divided into 5 Attainment Focus areas:

  • AF1 - Thinking scientifically
  • AF2 - Understanding the applications and implications of science
  • AF3 - Communicating and collaborating in science
  • AF4 - Using investigative processes
  • AF5 - Working critically with evidence

The level at which students are working and their progress is assessed in class tests and by dedicated activities in class and for homework.

The Kingsway School delivers the Science National Curriculum in a very practical way. We hope that the work done in Science will stimulate children's interest and curiosity in the world in which they live as well as giving them some insight into the way in which famous scientific discoveries were made. We feel that this will encourage the students to develop their interest in Science so that they may achieve their full potential and become scientifically aware young people. We are endeavouring whenever appropriate to include the use of IT, literacy and mathematical skills in our teaching programmes where students can practice and develop a range of useful life skills.

Students begin with a brief introduction to laboratory safety and basic scientific equipment and then begin to study the 12 different topics covering each of the attainment areas above. Each topic lasts about 3 weeks.

The topics are called:

  • 7HS Health and Safety
  • 7B1 Cells and Organisation
  • 7B2 Health
  • 7B3 Relationships in an Ecosystem
  • 7B4 Reproduction
  • 7C1 Acids, Alkalis and Neutralisation
  • 7C2 Chemical Reactions
  • 7C3 Pure and Impure Substances
  • 7C4 The Particulate Nature of Matter
  • 7P1 Physical Changes
  • 7P2 The Particle Model
  • 7P3 Current Electricity
  • 7P4 Energy and Fuel
  • 7P5 Describing Motion
  • 7P6 Forces

Homework
An important part of the learning process is homework. It is essential in helping to reinforce and establish information in students’ long-term memory. Homework will include a variety of different exercises, many of which will be accessed on-line via Workspaces.

Revision Guides are available in bookshops or at a discount through school. The SAM learning and BBC Bitesize websites provides fun activities to help students with their learning. When doing homework, revising for exams, or struggling with a new concept, students are encouraged to take control of their own learning and use revision guides or websites to help them.

Assessment
The Year 7 course is assessed in the terminal exam. The aim of this is to begin preparing students for the GCSE process, and to underline the importance of exam preparation. Following the terminal exam, students will be re-set when they start Year 8.

To give students and parents' guidance on the level the student is currently working at, internal assessments, such as homework questions and tests, will be used to estimate a level and to reset where necessary during the school year.

Year 8

In Year 8, students work in higher, middle or lower sets. They are placed in these sets according to their attainment in the exam at the end of Year 7. There are four higher sets, four middle sets and three lower sets. All the sets study the same course.

Course Description and National Curriculum Attainment Targets
During year 8, students build on the knowledge gained in year 7, to further extend their understanding of science. The Science course, following the National Curriculum, has been developed by science teachers at Kingsway School.

The Curriculum is divided into 5 Attainment Focus areas:

  • AF1 - Thinking scientifically
  • AF2 - Understanding the applications and implications of science
  • AF3 - Communicating and collaborating in science
  • AF4 - Using investigative processes
  • AF5 - Working critically with evidence

The level at which students are working and their progress is assessed in class tests and by dedicated activities in class which work towards the above attainment focus areas. Students will study 12 different topics which cover many aspects of Biology, Chemistry and Physics. Each topic lasts about 3 weeks.

The topics are called:

  • 8B1 The Skeletal and Muscular Systems
  • 8B2 Nutrition and Digestion
  • 8B3 Gas Exchange System
  • 8B4 Cellular Respiration
  • 8C1 Atoms Elements and Compounds
  • 8C2 The Periodic Table
  • 8C3 Earth and Atmosphere
  • 8HS Health and Safety
  • 8P1 Observed Waves
  • 8P2 Sound Waves
  • 8P3 Balanced Forces and Motion
  • 8P4 Static Electricity
  • 8P5 Energy in Matter

Homework
An important part of the learning process is homework. It is essential in helping to reinforce and establish information in students’ long-term memory. Homework will include a variety of different exercises, many of which will be accessed on-line via Workspaces.

Revision Guides are available in bookshops or at a discount through school. The SAM learning and BBC Bitesize websites provides fun activities to help students with their learning. When doing homework, revising for exams, or struggling with a new concept, students are encouraged to take control of their own learning and use revision guides or websites to help them.

Assessment
The Year 8 course is assessed in the terminal exam. The aim of this is to begin preparing students for the GCSE process, and to underline the importance of exam preparation. Following the terminal exam, students will be re-set when they start Year 9.

To give students and parents' guidance on the level the student is currently working at, internal assessments, such as homework questions and tests, will be used to estimate a level and to reset where necessary during the school year.

Year 9

In Year 9, students are taught in bands based on their attainment in the exam at the end of Year 8. The students are divided into two populations, X and Y. In each population there are five or six science classes. Each band will be a class with a range of abilities.

Course Description and National Curriculum Attainment Targets
During year 9, students build on the knowledge gained in years 7 and 8, to further extend their understanding of science. The Science course, following the National Curriculum, has been developed by science teachers at Kingsway School based on Longmans Exploring Science.

The material covered in the topics will include:

9HS: Health and Safety
In this topic we will learn:

  • select, plan and carry out the most appropriate types of scientific enquiries to test predictions, including identifying independent, dependent and control variables, where appropriate
  • make and record observations and measurements using a range of methods for different investigations; and evaluate the reliability of methods and suggest possible improvements
  • pay attention to objectivity and concern for accuracy, precision, repeatability and reproducibility

9B1: Plants
In this topic we will learn:

  • the reactants in, and products of, photosynthesis, and a word summary for photosynthesis
  • the dependence of almost all life on Earth on the ability of photosynthetic organisms, such as plants and algae, to use sunlight in photosynthesis to build organic molecules that are an essential energy store and to maintain levels of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the atmosphere
  • the adaptations of leaves for photosynthesis.

9B2: Inheritance chromosomes, DNA and genes
In this topic we will learn:

  • heredity as the process by which genetic information is transmitted from one generation to the next
  • a simple model of chromosomes, genes and DNA in heredity, including the part played by Watson, Crick, Wilkins and Franklin in the development of the DNA model
  • differences between species
  • the variation between individuals within a species being continuous or discontinuous, to include measurement and graphical representation of variation
  • the variation between species and between individuals of the same species means some organisms compete more successfully, which can drive natural selection
  • changes in the environment may leave individuals within a species, and some entire species, less well adapted to compete successfully and reproduce, which in turn may lead to extinction
  • the importance of maintaining biodiversity and the use of gene banks to preserve hereditary material.

9C1: Energetics
In this topic we will learn:

  • energy changes on changes of state (qualitative).
  • exothermic and endothermic chemical reactions (qualitative).
  • what catalysts do.

9C2: Materials

In this topic we will learn:

  • The order of the metals in the reactivity series
  • The use of carbon in obtaining metals from their oxides
  • The properties of polymers, ceramics and composites

9P1: Energy Changes

In this topic we will learn:

  • simple machines give bigger force but at the expense of smaller movement (and vice versa): product of force and displacement unchanged
  • heating and thermal equilibrium: temperature difference between two objects leading to energy transfer from the hotter to the cooler one, through contact (conduction) or radiation; such transfers tending to reduce the temperature difference: use of insulators
  • other processes that involve energy transfer: changing motion, dropping an object, completing an electrical circuit, stretching a spring, metabolism of food, burning fuels.
  • energy as a quantity that can be quantified and calculated; the total energy has the same value before and after a change
  • comparing the starting with the final conditions of a system and describing increases and decreases in the amounts of energy associated with movements, temperatures, changes in positions in a field, in elastic distortions and in chemical compositions
  • using physical processes and mechanisms, rather than energy, to explain the intermediate steps that bring about such changes.

9P2: Calculations of fuel uses
In this topic we will learn:

  • comparing energy values of different foods (from labels) (kJ)
  • comparing power ratings of appliances in watts (W, kW)
  • comparing amounts of energy transferred (J, kJ, kW hour)
  • domestic fuel bills, fuel use and costs

9P3: Pressure forces
In this topic we will learn

  • atmospheric pressure, decreases with increase of height as weight of air above decreases with height
  • pressure in liquids, increasing with depth; upthrust effects, floating and sinking
  • pressure measured by ratio of force over area – acting normal to any surface.

9P4: Magnetism
In this topic we will learn

  • magnetic poles, attraction and repulsion
  • magnetic fields by plotting with compass, representation by field lines
  • Earth’s magnetism, compass and navigation
  • the magnetic effect of a current, electromagnets, D.C. motors
  • differences in resistance between conducting and insulating components

GCSE
From early March onwards students will embark on KS4 Science. Due to the demands of subject content, this allows both staff and students time to cover the course material and prepare for key practical pieces which are required to be undertaken by each individual student.

Homework
An important part of the learning process is homework. It is essential in helping to reinforce and establish information in students’ long-term memory. Homework will include a variety of different exercises, many of which will be accessed on-line

Revision Guides are available in bookshops or at a discount through school. The BBC Bitesize website provides fun activities to help students with their learning. When doing homework, revising for exams, or struggling with a new concept, students are encouraged to take control of their own learning and use revision guides or websites to help them.

Assessment
The Year 9 course is assessed in the terminal exam. The aim of this is to begin preparing students for the GCSE process, and to underline the importance of exam preparation. Following the terminal exam, students will be re-set based upon option choices.

GCSE

Combined Science attempts to explain the world in which we live. It looks at technologies that have had a great impact on our society and the environment. This course focuses on how science works. It will make science more relevant to all students.

Combined Science will occupy 20% of the timetable and will include Biology, Chemistry and Physics modules.

Assessment
The assessment for GCSE Combined Science is 100% externally assessed exams in May/June of Year 11.

The exams test the students’ knowledge of Biology, Chemistry and Physics; as well as their ability to use scientific equipment safely and precisely. It also looks at their data-handling and evaluation skills and their ability to select and control variables to ensure fair tests. Students’ understanding of the impact of Science on society, economics and the environment is also examined.

This is a double-award, and at the end of it students will get two GCSEs in Science.

Separate Sciences

Students who are keen on Science can opt to do Single Sciences (also known as Triple Science) which gives students three science GCSEs. Opting for Single Sciences uses up one option choice. Students who do not wish to study Single Sciences study Combined Science which gives them two science GCSEs.

Single Sciences
Students have the opportunity to choose to study the three separate Sciences – Biology, Chemistry and Physics. One GCSE will be awarded for each subject (three in total) at the end of Year 11.

These courses are suited to those students of a higher ability who enjoy Science and anyone intending to study any Science subject at A-level. Students following these courses will have one specialist teacher for each Science subject. These courses will occupy 30% of the timetable (as they are an Option subject as well as the compulsory Science).

The assessment for GCSE Single Science is 100% externally assessed exams in May/June of Year 11.

The internal assessment challenges each student’s ability to use scientific equipment accurately, safely and precisely. It also looks at their data-handling and evaluation skills and their ability to select and control variables to ensure fair tests.

In order to study Single Sciences, students need to be placed in sets 1 or 2 in Year 9. Individual students who would like to take Single Science from sets 3 and 4 will be able to discuss their reasons with the Head of Science, Mr Watson during Spring Term.

Combined Science
Combined Science attempts to explain the world in which we live. It looks at technologies that have had a great impact on our society and the environment. This course focuses on how science works. It will make science more relevant to all students.

Combined Science will occupy 20% of the timetable and will include Biology, Chemistry and Physics modules.

The assessment for GCSE Combined Science is 100% externally assessed exams in May/June of Year 11.

The exams test the students’ knowledge of Biology, Chemistry and Physics; as well as their ability to use scientific equipment safely and precisely. It also looks at their data-handling and evaluation skills and their ability to select and control variables to ensure fair tests. Students’ understanding of the impact of Science on society, economics and the environment is also examined.

This is a double-award, and at the end of it students will get two GCSEs in Science.

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