Year 7

History fires pupils' curiosity and imagination, moving and inspiring them with the dilemmas, choices and beliefs of people in the past. It helps pupils develop their own identities through an understanding of history at personal, local, national and international levels. It helps them to ask and answer questions of the present by engaging with the past.

Pupils find out about the history of their community, Britain, Europe and the world. They develop a chronological overview that enables them to make connections within and across different periods and societies. They investigate Britain's relationships with the wider world, and relate past events to the present day.

As they develop their understanding of the nature of historical study, pupils ask and answer important questions, evaluate evidence, identify and analyse different interpretations of the past, and learn to substantiate any arguments and judgements they make. They appreciate why they are learning what they are learning and can debate its significance.

History prepares pupils for the future, equipping them with knowledge and skills that are prized in adult life, enhancing employability and developing an ability to take part in a democratic society. It encourages mutual understanding of the historic origins of our ethnic and cultural diversity, and helps pupils become confident and questioning individuals.
In History students cover key concepts and processes through the medium of 3 units of study.

Term 1: What is History? (8 weeks)
This unit will introduce the techniques employed by historians in order to develop an understanding of the past. The key concepts will be introduced helping the students develop a clearer understanding of what the study of History involves. Students will learn about: Evidence, Chronology, Change and Continuity and Cause and Consequence. Emphasis will be placed on the investigation element allowing students to examine a range of sources in an enquiry, in order to develop skills in using evidence. The assessment is on chronology.

Unit 2 - What have the Romans ever done for us? (7 weeks)
This unit covers the legacy of the Roman empire and their way of life, belief systems and army. There is an assessment at the end of this unit of study.

Unit 3: Britain 1066 - 1500 (Two terms)
A study of major features of Britain's medieval past and the legacy of the period to the modern world. Students will study the development of the monarchy, and significant events and features of the lives of people living throughout the British Isles. Topics covered will include the Norman Conquest, the Feudal System, the influence of the Church, daily life of peasants, the Black Death. Two assessments are covered in this unit covering organisation and communication interpretations.

Through this content, year 7 students will cover key concepts and key processes:

1. Key concepts
There are a number of key concepts that underpin the study of history. Pupils need to understand these concepts in order to deepen and broaden their knowledge, skills and understanding.
I) Chronological understanding
II) Cultural, ethnic and religious diversity
III) Change and continuity
IV) Cause and consequence
V) Chronological understanding

2. Key processes
These are the essential skills and processes in history that pupils need to learn to make progress.
I) Historical enquiry
II) Using evidence
III) Communicating about the past.
Students will sit three National Curriculum assessments throughout the academic year in order for us to make informed decisions about what National Curriculum level they have attained. Students use these assessments to set targets for improvement and are clear how they can progress to the next level. In addition year 7 students will sit a History examination at the end of the summer term.

Homework
Thirty minutes homework will be set once per week.

History Club
Year 7 History Club meets every Wednesday and allows students of all abilities to make discoveries about historical events and people.

Year 8

Year 8 are studying a new programme of study this year. It follows on from your work in year 7 on concepts and processes.

Unit 1: Britain 1500 - 1750 (One and a half terms)
A study of crowns, parliaments and people. In this unit students will learn about the major political, religious and social changes affecting people throughout the British Isles. This will include the Tudor period, Religious change, The English Civil War and the political unification of Britain. Pupils write two levelled assessments on this unit of study.

Unit 2: Britain 1750 - 1900 (One and a half terms)
A study of how expansion of trade and colonisation, industrialisation and political changes affected the United Kingdom. Students will study the revolutions in agriculture and industry, the growth of Empire and the changes in democracy. This includes an 8 lesson depth study on Jack the Ripper.

Through this content, year 8 students will cover key concepts and key processes:

1. Key concepts
There are a number of key concepts that underpin the study of history. Pupils need to understand these concepts in order to deepen and broaden their knowledge, skills and understanding.
I) Chronological understanding
II) Cultural, ethnic and religious diversity
III) Change and continuity
IV) Cause and consequence
V) Chronological understanding

2. Key processes
These are the essential skills and processes in history that pupils need to learn to make progress.
I) Historical enquiry
II) Using evidence
III) Communicating about the past

Students will sit three National Curriculum assessments throughout the academic year in order for us to make informed decisions about what National Curriculum level they have attained. Students use these assessments to set clear targets for themselves and to understand what they need to do to progress to the next level. In addition year 8 students will sit a History examination at the end of the summer term.

Homework
30 minutes homework will be set once per week. This will either be a written assignment, research, learning/revising or reading. Some tasks have instructions provided on Kingsway Online.

Year 9

Unit 1: A world study after 1900 - The 20th Century World (Two terms)
In this unit students will learn about some of the significant individuals, events and developments from across the 20th century, including the two World Wars, the Holocaust, the Cold War and their impact on Britain, Europe and the wider world. This will include the roles played by Lenin, Stalin, Hitler, Churchill and Roosevelt. Pupils write three assessments on this unit of study covering the skills of causation and organisation and communication.

Unit 2: Black Peoples of the Americas (One term)
In this unit students will study the culture, beliefs and achievements of the Black Peoples of the Americas. This will include study of the slave trade, the Middle Passage, life on the Plantations, the slave revolt, the Civil War and Civil Rights.

Through this content, year 9 students will cover key concepts and key processes:

1. Key concepts
There are a number of key concepts that underpin the study of history. Pupils need to understand these concepts in order to deepen and broaden their knowledge, skills and understanding.
I) Chronological understanding
II) Cultural, ethnic and religious diversity
III) Change and continuity
IV) Cause and consequence
V) Chronological understanding

2. Key processes
These are the essential skills and processes in history that pupils need to learn to make progress.
I) Historical enquiry
II) Using evidence
III) Communicating about the past.

Students will sit three National Curriculum assessments throughout the academic year in order for us to make informed decisions about what National Curriculum level they have attained. Students use these assessments to set targets for themselves and to make themselves fully aware of what they need to do to progress to the next level. In addition year 9 students will sit a History examination at the end of the summer term.

Trips and events
Year 9 enjoy a visit from Jason King an expert on World War one who fills the hall with artefacts and lets you learn from asking questions of objects from this time.

Homework
Homework will be set once a week. This will either be a written assignment, research, learning/revising or reading. All tasks are of equal importance. Students should spend roughly thirty minutes on their homework.

GCSE

Through the study of History, GCSE students will not only learn about the subject content detailed below but will develop a number of skills that are useful in other subjects and when you start work.

You will learn how people tick, what motivates them, what they think and feel. You are able to gather and read information and check it for bias or propaganda. You learn to construct reasoned arguments and make informed judgements both verbally and on paper.

The course aims to ‘Explain the Modern World’ especially with regard to:

  • The struggle between different types of government
  • The rise and fall of communism as a political, ideological and economic model
  • Human Rights
  • The idea of powers and super powers
  • Ideas of nation and nationalism
  • How ideology can impact politics
  • Why there are different interpretations of current events

Assessment
History has 3 exam papers. We use the OCR examination board.

Paper 1: 1 hour 45 minutes (50%)

  • International relations: The changing international order 1918-2001
  • Depth study: The USA 1945-1974, The people and the State.

Paper 2: 1 hour (25%)

  • British Depth Study-Power: Monarchy and Democracy in Britain c1000 to 2014

Paper 3: 1 hour 15 minutes (25%)

  • The English Reformation c1520-1550
  • Castles: Form and function 1000-1750
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